CLIENT'S FEEDBACK : "Dr. Ram Kumar is a psychiatrist with specialty in homeopathy..... He is best homeopathic doctor for mental problems. Salute to Dr. Ram Kumar" -- Vinit Shankar | "My whole family takes treatment from Dr.Kumar whenever needed.... A must visit doctor"-- Dominic jaggi | "I really thank God for the gift of Dr.Ram Kumar... I greatly appreciate his work--" AIRIS MARY | “Dr. R. Kumar is a good psychiatrist and an awesome counselor. He is an excellent physician having wide knowledge of different systems of medicine.” Bishwendra | "Dr. Kumar have a wide approach towards different system of medicine which makes him an excellent healer.." --Dr. Anju Gupta | "I sincerely recommend Dr.Ram Kumar's unique practice for everyone who wants to have a better and more full filling life".--- Priyanka | "He filled my life with courage and enthusiasm. I get my life back full of happiness and joy.World is so beautiful for me now,even my husband started understand me. God bless him for making my life beautiful like heaven."--- Varsha Roy | "He resolves all my issues regarding my depression and guide me to focus on my goals and aims... after hypnotherapy my vision also improved and I don't need them now. Thanks to Dr. Ram Kumar."-- Monika | "I dont over estimate my problems now. I am realistic and positive. Thanks for everything... to Doctor Ram Kumar" -- Ashutosh | “After surviving some horrifying experiences, I was always afraid…. Now life is easier and girls tell me I am much more confident.. ready for everything”... Randeep jain
 

Treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Homeopathic Treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia. Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities. It was first described by German psychiatrist and neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer in 1906 and was named after him.

Alzheimer's disease begins slowly. It first involves the parts of the brain that control thought, memory and language. People with Alzheimer's disease may have trouble remembering things that happened recently or names of people they know. In Alzheimer's disease, over time, symptoms get worse. People may not recognize family members or have trouble speaking, reading or writing. They may forget how to brush their teeth or comb their hair. Later on, they may become anxious or aggressive, or wander away from home. Eventually, they need total care. This can cause great stress for family members who must care for them.

AD usually begins after age 60. The risk goes up as you get older. Your risk is also higher if a family member has had the disease.

In Alzheimer's disease, the connections between brain cells and the brain cells themselves degenerate and die, causing a steady decline in memory and mental function.

Causes of Alzheimer’s disease:

Alzheimer's disease is caused by parts of the brain wasting away (atrophy), which damages the structure of the brain and how it works.

It is not known exactly what causes this process to begin, but people with Alzheimer's disease have been found to have abnormal amounts of protein (amyloid plaques) and fibres (tau tangles) in the brain.

These reduce the effectiveness of healthy neurons (nerve cells that carry messages to and from the brain), gradually destroying them.

Over time, this damage spreads to other areas of the brain, such as the grey matter (responsible for processing thoughts) and the hippocampus (responsible for memory).

Risk factors:

Although it is still unknown what causes the deterioration of brain cells, there are several factors that are known to affect the development of Alzheimer's disease. These are described in more detail below.

Age:

Age is the greatest factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The likelihood of developing the condition doubles every five years after you reach 65 years of age. However, it is not just older people who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

Family history:

Genetic factors contribute to the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Though in most cases, if you have a close family member with the condition, your risk of developing it is only slightly increased.

Hormones:

Researchers have found that men with lower levels of testosterone were found to have higher levels of beta amyloid protein that is linked to Alzheimer's . Beta amyloid protein is a toxic substance that can kill neurons in the areas of the brain that are important for learning and memory and is widely thought to lead to Alzheimer's

Down's syndrome:

People with Down's syndrome are at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

This is because people with Down's syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, which codes for a protein involved in the cause of Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, people with Down's syndrome produce more abnormal protein, which could contribute to developing Alzheimer's disease.

Whiplash and head injuries:

People who have had a severe head injury, or severe whiplash, (a neck injury caused by a sudden movement of the head forwards, backwards or sideways) have been found to be at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

Vascular disease:

Research shows that several lifestyle factors and conditions associated with vascular disease can increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

These include:

  • smoking
  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol

Symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease:

At first, increasing forgetfulness or mild confusion may be the only symptoms of Alzheimer's disease that you notice. But over time, the disease robs you of more of your memory, especially recent memories. The rate at which symptoms worsen varies from person to person

Brain changes associated with Alzheimer's disease lead to growing trouble with:

Memory:

Everyone has occasional memory lapses. It's normal to lose track of where you put your keys or forget the name of an acquaintance. But the memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease persists and worsens, affecting your ability to function at work and at home.

People with Alzheimer's may:

  • Repeat statements and questions over and over, not realizing that they've asked the question before
  • Forget conversations, appointments or events, and not remember them later
  • Routinely misplace possessions, often putting them in illogical locations
  • Eventually forget the names of family members and everyday objects
  • Disorientation and misinterpreting spatial relationships
  • People with Alzheimer's disease may lose their sense of what day it is, the season, where they are or even their current life circumstances.
  • Alzheimer's may also disrupt your brain's ability to interpret what you see, making it difficult to understand your surroundings. Eventually, these problems may lead to getting lost in familiar places.

Speaking and writing:

Those with Alzheimer's may have trouble finding the right words to identify objects, express thoughts or take part in conversations. Over time, the ability to read and write also declines.

Thinking and reasoning:

Alzheimer's disease causes difficulty concentrating and thinking, especially about abstract concepts like numbers. It may be challenging to manage finances, balance checkbooks, and keep track of bills and pay them on time. These difficulties may progress to inability to recognize and deal with numbers.

Making judgments and decisions:

Responding effectively to everyday problems, such as food burning on the stove or unexpected driving situations, becomes increasingly challenging.

Planning and performing familiar tasks:

Once-routine activities that require sequential steps, such as planning and cooking a meal or playing a favorite game, become a struggle as the disease progresses. Eventually, people with advanced Alzheimer's may forget how to perform basic tasks such as dressing and bathing.

Changes in personality and behavior:

Brain changes that occur in Alzheimer's disease can affect the way you act and how you feel. People with Alzheimer's may experience:

  • Depression
  • Social withdrawal
  • Mood swings
  • Distrust in others
  • Irritability and aggressiveness
  • Changes in sleeping habits
  • Wandering
  • Loss of inhibitions
  • Delusions, such as believing something has been stolen

Stages of Alzheimer’s disease:

Stage 1: No impairment (normal function)

The person does not experience any memory problems. An interview with a medical professional does not show any evidence of symptoms of dementia.

Stage 2:Very mild cognitive decline (may be normal age-related changes or earliest signs of Alzheimer's disease)

The person may feel as if he or she is having memory lapses — forgetting familiar words or the location of everyday objects. But no symptoms of dementia can be detected during a medical examination or by friends, family or co-workers.

Stage 3:Mild cognitive decline (early-stage Alzheimer's can be diagnosed in some, but not all, individuals with these symptoms)

Friends, family or co-workers begin to notice difficulties. During a detailed medical interview, doctors may be able to detect problems in memory or concentration. Common stage 3 difficulties include:

  • Noticeable problems coming up with the right word or name
  • Trouble remembering names when introduced to new people
  • Having noticeably greater difficulty performing tasks in social or work settings Forgetting material that one has just read
  • Losing or misplacing a valuable object
  • Increasing trouble with planning or organizing

Stage 4: Moderate cognitive decline:

(Mild or early-stage Alzheimer's disease)

  • At this point, a careful medical interview should be able to detect clear-cut symptoms in several areas:
  • Forgetfulness of recent events
  • Impaired ability to perform challenging mental arithmetic — for example, counting backward from 100 by 7s
  • Greater difficulty performing complex tasks, such as planning dinner for guests, paying bills or managing finances
  • Forgetfulness about one's own personal history
  • Becoming moody or withdrawn, especially in socially or mentally challenging situations

Stage 5: Moderately severe cognitive decline:

(Moderate or mid-stage Alzheimer's disease)

Gaps in memory and thinking are noticeable, and individuals begin to need help with day-to-day activities. At this stage, those with Alzheimer's may:

  • Be unable to recall their own address or telephone number or the high school or college from which they graduated
  • Become confused about where they are or what day it is
  • Have trouble with less challenging mental arithmetic; such as counting backward from 40 by subtracting 4s or from 20 by 2s
  • Need help choosing proper clothing for the season or the occasion
  • Still remember significant details about themselves and their family
  • Still require no assistance with eating or using the toilet

Stage 6: Severe cognitive decline:

(Moderately severe or mid-stage Alzheimer's disease)

Memory continues to worsen, personality changes may take place and individuals need extensive help with daily activities. At this stage, individuals may:

  • Lose awareness of recent experiences as well as of their surroundings
  • Remember their own name but have difficulty with their personal history
  • Distinguish familiar and unfamiliar faces but have trouble remembering the name of a spouse or caregiver
  • Need help dressing properly and may, without supervision, make mistakes such as putting pajamas over daytime clothes or shoes on the wrong feet
  • Experience major changes in sleep patterns — sleeping during the day and becoming restless at night
  • Need help handling details of toileting (for example, flushing the toilet, wiping or disposing of tissue properly)
  • Have increasingly frequent trouble controlling their bladder or bowels
  • Experience major personality and behavioral changes, including suspiciousness and delusions (such as believing that their caregiver is an impostor)or compulsive, repetitive behavior like hand-wringing or tissue shredding
  • Tend to wander or become lost

Stage 7: Very severe cognitive decline:

(Severe or late-stage Alzheimer's disease)

In the final stage of this disease, individuals lose the ability to respond to their environment, to carry on a conversation and, eventually, to control movement. They may still say words or phrases.

At this stage, individuals need help with much of their daily personal care, including eating or using the toilet. They may also lose the ability to smile, to sit without support and to hold their heads up. Reflexes become abnormal. Muscles grow rigid. Swallowing impaired.

Remember:It is difficult to place a person with Alzheimer's in a specific stage as stages may overlap.

Treatment of Alzheimer’s disease:

Homeopathic Treatment of Alzheimer’s disease:

Alzheimer's can be treated by homeopathy, as it has been proved thousands of time all over world. Homeopathy is one such branch of therapeutics, which believes in treating the patient who is diseased and not merely diseased parts of the patients. This holistic approach goes in a long way in the management of various chronic and deep-seated diseases, including Alzheimer's. It goes without saying that every person is unique and dementia affects people differently - no two people will follow exactly the same course. Hence, an approach to dementia care, which recognizes the personal history, character and individuality of the person with Alzheimer's, has been shown to have a positive impact on the progress of the disease.AD is one such condition, where homeopathy has following role to play: To control the disease process whereby further deterioration of the brain damage is helped to certain extent and to improve to an extent some of the symptoms: communication, failing memory, anxiety, restlessness, etc.

Many of the problems associated with dementia such as restlessness, depression, and agitation can be treated effectively and gently with homeopathy. It may also be possible, especially in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, to improve someone's memory with homeopathic medication. Timely administered homeopathy medicines can prevent further progress of disease.

Allopathic Treatment of Alzheimer’s disease:

Current Alzheimer's medications can help for a time with memory symptoms and other cognitive changes. Two types of drugs are currently used to treat cognitive symptoms:

Cholinesterase inhibitors: These drugs work by boosting levels of a cell-to-cell communication chemical depleted in the brain by Alzheimer's disease. Most people can expect to keep their current symptoms at bay for a time. Less than half of those taking these drugs can expect to have any improvement. Commonly prescribed cholinesterase inhibitors include donepezil (Aricept), galantamine (Razadyne) and rivastigmine (Exelon).

Memantine (Namenda): This drug works in another brain cell communication network and slows the progression of symptoms with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease. It's sometimes used in combination with a cholinesterase inhibitor.

Creating a safe and supportive environment

Adapting the living situation to the needs of a person with Alzheimer's is an important part of any treatment plan. You can take these steps to support a person's sense of well-being and continued ability to function:

  • Remove excess furniture, clutter and throw rugs.
  • Install sturdy handrails on stairways and in bathrooms.
  • Ensure that shoes and slippers are comfortable and provide good traction.
  • Reduce the number of mirrors. People with Alzheimer's may find images in mirrors confusing or frightening.

Exercise:

Regular exercise is an important part of everybody's wellness plan — and those with Alzheimer's are no exception. Activities like a daily 30-minute walk can help improve mood and maintain the health of joints, muscles and your heart. Exercise can also promote restful sleep and prevent constipation. Make sure that the person with Alzheimer's carries identification if she or he walks unaccompanied.

Nutrition:

People with Alzheimer's may forget to eat, lose interest in preparing meals or not eat a healthy combination of foods. They may also forget to drink enough, leading to dehydration and constipation. Try to ensure that a person with Alzheimer's drinks at least several full glasses of liquids every day. Avoid beverages with caffeine, which can increase restlessness, interfere with sleep and trigger frequent need to urinate.